The World

The world is defined as being "the earth, together with all of its countries, peoples, and natural features; a part or aspect of human life or of the natural features of the earth, in particular."

To the Pioneering Mystic traveling the Via Christa, the world is much larger than our planet, or solar system or even our galaxy. Edna Lister often said that what metaphysicians and mystics believe is the truth, science will one day prove and accept as scientific facts. A mystic is wise enough never to close the question on the world of the unseen, but the rationalist closes the question as soon as possible and endlessly. History proves this.

What science calls the heliosphere, the mystic knows to be the electromagnetic wall around the world, which is spherical in shape. Its surface is punctuated along a 360-degree band, like a belt around a beach ball, at precise 30-degree intervals with ingress/egress structures that we mystics call the Gates of Light. The realms of heaven lie beyond the heliosphere, an immeasurable, virtually inconceivable distance from our physical solar system.

Physics dictates that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. However, man's technology remains unable as yet to collapse time and space the way Star Trek warp drives can. Man is not yet able to leave our solar system. To the Pioneering Mystic, physical limits do not apply. Since we are not in bondage to the world or its opinions and prejudices, we are not limited to traveling at the speed of light, for we travel at the speed of soul.

Curious astronomers and physicists began investigating what they called the solar wind in the 1800s. Later, in the 1950s, their cosmic ray studies led physicists to the discovery of what we now call the heliosphere. Dr. David H. Hathaway describes our current knowledge of the heliosphere in an article at The National Aeronautics and Space Administration website, which we quote here:

The heliosphere is a bubble in space produced by the solar wind. Although electrically neutral atoms from interstellar space can penetrate this bubble, virtually all of the material in the heliosphere emanates from the Sun itself.
The solar wind streams off of the Sun in all directions at speeds of several hundred km/s (about 1,000,000 mph in the Earth's vicinity). At some distance from the Sun, well beyond the orbit of Pluto, this supersonic wind must slow down to meet the gases in the interstellar medium. It must first pass through a shock, the termination shock, to become subsonic. It then slows down and gets turned in the direction of the ambient flow of the interstellar medium to form a comet-like tail behind the Sun. This subsonic flow region is called the helio-sheath. The outer surface of the helio-sheath, where the heliosphere meets the interstellar medium, is called the heliopause.
The precise distance to, and shape of, the heliopause is still uncertain. Interplanetary spacecraft such as Pioneer 10 and 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 are traveling outward through the solar system and will eventually pass through the heliopause.
The solar wind consists of particles, ionized atoms from the solar corona, and fields, in particular magnetic fields. As the Sun rotates once in about 27 days, the magnetic field transported by the solar wind gets wrapped into a spiral. Variations in the Sun's magnetic field are carried outward by the solar wind and can produce magnetic storms in the Earth's own magnetosphere.

Science in all its fields, including all branches of physics, deals with facts, which make their discoverers and believers feel comfortable and "right." Facts too often form their religion. To the Pioneering Mystic, walking the Via Christa, the truth is often best expressed by a poet:

Definition of the Frontiers

First there is the wind but not like the familiar wind but long and without lapses or falling away or surges of air as is usual but rather like the persistent pressure of a river or a running tide.

This wind is from the other side and has an odor unlike the odor of the winds with us but like time if time had odor and were cold and carried a bitter and sharp taste like rust on the taste of snow or the fragrance of thunder.

When the air has this taste of time the frontiers are not far from us.
– Archibald MacLeish

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Edna Miriam Lister
1884 –1971
The original Pioneering Mystic
minister, teacher, and author

Edna Lister


References

"The Heliosphere": You may view this and many other informative articles at the NASA website. [Acessed August 25, 2018.]

Archibald MacLeish, "Definition of the Frontiers" from Collected Poems 1917-1982. Copyright © 1985 by The Estate of Archibald MacLeish. Reprinted with the permission of Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


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