Observation

To observe is "to be or become aware of, especially through careful and directed attention, to notice, or watch attentively."

Observation is an abstract principle, a law of being and of doing, and a virtue. Observation is a law of being; you must be observant. Observation is a law of doing; you must observe to avoid blunders.

Observation is the lower pole of illumination. Observation is based on alertness, logic, reasoning, and how you apply all you know to everything you do. Discrimination is the art of observation raised to its zenith and pinnacle of power.






Edna Lister on Observation

Observation consists in discovery by actual perception that things and their relations objectively exist in the universe. Upon this experience all human knowledge begins. – Edna Lister, The Scientific Method, September 30, 1935.

You first see spiritually by observation. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, June 30, 1944.

Observe first and plan before you enter a new situation, then move in and do. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 3, 1945.

Observation is a great law; observe everything about you. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 9, 1945.

Ignorance is lack of observation or definite lukewarmness, indifference or failure to care after observation has taken place. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 10, 1945.

Be alert, observant, discriminating and discreet. There is no point of modification for it – you either are or are not, 100 percent or zero. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, October 12, 1945.

Observation is always the first law in a new situation, to accept instantly with no excuses. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 14, 1947.

"I now observe every detail of my life. I am alive and alert to observe above and below. As I use observation in my outer life, according to my practice of observation, exactly so shall I see and hear in heaven, the inner." This is the third great law of the creator. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 5, 1947.

Balanced observation comes from remaining just above the body's grip, the soul reaching down, filling it lightly for control, but in conquering in the higher creative center (within the head). – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 30, 1947.

Observation is based on alertness, logic, reasoning, and how you apply all you know to everything you do. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, November 13, 1947.

You become perfect not by worshiping the self, but through attention and observation. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, December 13, 1947.

Be observant in the little things; look about to see what to do. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, January 8, 1948.

Observe always, and size up the situation from above. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, January 8, 1948.

Observe to avoid blunders, to plan the efficient perfect way, then move in and do. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 26, 1950.

The law of observation means to see and instantly lift what is in the self. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, December 30, 1951.

When stepping into a new situation, stop and observe first before doing anything. Use your faculties before acting: Stop and bring logic, reason, discretion, discrimination and discernment and to bear; pause for this process, then speak or act. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, June 26, 1956.

Discrimination is the art of observation raised to its zenith and pinnacle of power. Through observation, you develop a fine sense of timing and balance. – Edna Lister, Your Capacity for Freedom, November 17, 1957.

Observation is watchfulness over the whole of your life in action, to observe yourself and others' reactions to you. Accepting without observation is useless. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, November 11, 1958.

As you observe from above and use your soul equipment, the Power of God's wisdom and truth flows through your faculties. – Edna Lister, Love Unquenchable, December 7, 1958.

"I observe" means to watch that first downward trend in consciousness. Be on the job, not found wanting under sudden stress. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, December 15, 1958.

"I observe" means I heed, I obey, I love. Observe and be loving in all statements. No harsh words. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, December 15, 1958.

As you use observation in your outer life, according to your practice of observation, exactly so shall you see and hear in heaven. – Edna Lister, Eight Great Powers of Being, June 23, 1959.

As the Light moves through, as you observe and pay attention, through praise, the gifts of spiritual seeing and hearing open. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 24, 1961.

Observation is the lower pole of illumination. It happens "like a thief in the night." You can see the shadows that obliviousness casts in the now. You know it when life pins your ears back and you can see that you've "been had" and are caught out of bounds. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, July 24, 1961.

The law of observance is acceptance coupled with logic, reason, discretion, discrimination and discernment for consideration. "Lord, please don't let me miss any detail today." – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, August 3, 1961.

Observation is a law with five component parts: Logic, reason, discretion, discrimination and discernment, that equal understanding. You must apply these mental faculties simultaneously as a constant process in everything you do. Observation then becomes an instantaneous act. – Edna Lister, Unpublished Papers, September 12, 1961.

To be aware, you must be conscious that awareness is conscious recognition of everything through observation. – Edna Lister, Awareness and Becoming Law, May 26, 1968.

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New Testament on Observation

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour. – 1 Peter 5:8.

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Etymology of observe: Latin observare, "to abide by, watch": ob-, "over" + servare, "to keep, watch."


Observation is an abstract principle.

Observation is a law of being.

Observation is a law of doing.

Observation is a soul virtue.


Quotes

Nothing is so productive of elevation of mind as to be able to examine methodically and truly every object which is presented to thee in life, and always to look at things so as to see at the same time what kind of universe this is, and what kind of use everything performs in it, and what value everything has with reference to the whole, and what with reference to man. – Marcus Aurelius, Meditations III, 11

Even genius itself is but fine observation strengthened by fixity of purpose. Every man who observes vigilantly and resolves steadfastly grows unconsciously into genius. – Edward G. Bulwer-Lytton, On the Management of Money


References

Aurelius, Marcus. "The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius" as quoted inThe Harvard Classics, Volume II, Part 3. George Long, translator. New York: P.F. Collier & Son, 1909-14; Bartleby.com, 2001 [accessed March 1, 2017].

Bulwer Lytton, Edward. "On the Management of Money," Caxtoniana: A Series of Essays on Life, Literature, and Manners, Essay VII. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1864, 69.

The Compact Edition of The Oxford English Dictionary: 2 volumes. E.S.C. Weiner, editor. Oxford University Press, 1971.

The Holy Bible. King James Version (KJV), Public Domain.


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