Laws in Eugnostos the Blessed

God is immortal and eternal, having no birth; for everyone who has birth will perish. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God is unbegotten, having no beginning; for everyone who has a beginning has an end. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God has no name; for whoever has a name is the creation of another; He is unnameable. He is called 'Father of the Universe.' – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God has no human form; for whoever has human form is the creation of another. He has His own semblance – not like the semblance we have received and seen, but a strange semblance that surpasses all things and is better than the totalities. It looks to every side and sees itself from itself. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God is infinite; He is incomprehensible. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God is ever imperishable and has no likeness to anything; He is unchanging good. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God is unknowable, while He nonetheless knows Himself. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God embraces the totalities of the totalities, and nothing embraces Him. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

God is all mind, thought and reflecting, considering, rationality and power. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

Everything that came from the perishable will perish, since it came from the perishable. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

Whatever came from imperishableness will not perish but will become imperishable, since it came from imperishableness. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

The Unknowable is ever full of imperishableness and ineffable joy. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

All natures from the Immortal One, from Unbegotten to the revelation of chaos, are in the Light that shines without shadow and in ineffable joy and unutterable jubilation. – Eugnostos the Blessed, Codices III, 3 and V, 1

Eugnostos the Blessed was translated combining Nag Hammadi Codices III, 3 and V, 1. The Sophia of Jesus the Christ, which is a later version of the same document, appears in Codex III, 4 and BG 8502, 3. The Nag Hammadi Codices, a set of fifty-two religious and philosophical texts, are so named because a peasant found them near Nag Hammadi, Egypt. Unfortunately, his family burned an unknown number of them as fuel before discovering they were valuable. They languished in the Coptic Museum at Cairo for years until a scholar came searching. See the full history at:
www.nag-hammadi.com/

Estimated dates for Eugnostos the Blessed are within the first century A.D. We have used the Douglas M. Parrott translation for this list.

References

Parrott, Douglas M., Trans. "Eugnostos the Blessed and The Sophia of Jesus Christ." The Nag Hammadi Library. Ed. James M. Robinson. San Francisco, Harper & Row, 1981. 206-228.

Peter Kirby has formulated an impressive collection of early Christian documents and links available at: www.earlychristianwritings.com

The text of Eugnostos the Blessed is available online at: www.gnosis.org/...


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