Law in On the Origin of the World

Everyone must go to the place from which he has come. Indeed, by his acts and his knowledge, each person will make his (own) nature known. – On the Origin of the World, Codex II, 5

On the Origin of the World was translated from the Nag Hammadi Codex II,5. The Nag Hammadi Codices, a set of fifty-two religious and philosophical texts, are so named because a peasant found them near Nag Hammadi, Egypt. Unfortunately, his family burned an unknown number of them as fuel before discovering they were valuable. They languished in the Coptic Museum at Cairo for years until a scholar came searching. See the full history at:
www.nag-hammadi.com/

On the Origin of the World was translated from the Nag Hammadi Codex II,5 which dates from the end of the third century or beginning of the fourth, A.D. The text is a collection of Gnostic ideas on the Creation, not on law. We have used the Bethge-Wintermute translation for this entry.

References

Bethge, Hans-Gebhard and Orval S. Wintermute, Trans. "On the Origin of the World." The Nag Hammadi Library. Ed. James M. Robinson. San Francisco, Harper & Row, 1981. 161-179.

This On the Origin of the World text is available online at: www.gnosis.org/...


Search Our Site